The Journal Of Antiquities

Ancient Sites In Great Britain & Southern Ireland


Dragon Stone, Near Steeton, West Yorkshire

Dragon Stone - cup-marked rock near Steeton, west Yorkshire

Dragon Stone (cup-marked rock) near Steeton, west Yorkshire

    OS grid reference: SE 03604 03695. In a farmer’s field above Little Snowden Hill, near Steeton, west Yorkshire, there is a cluster of rocks in an area of rough ground which have prehistoric cup-marks, one of these rocks being locally known as ‘Dragon Stone’. And in the next field along there is another cluster of rocks which also look to have faint cup-marks. This so-called ‘Dragon Stone’ has several quite prominent little cups and there are also some grooves which may be part of the carvings here. However these carved rocks are on private farm-land and there is no designated footpath. To reach the rocks you “might” be able to walk along the overgrown track leading off from Hollins Bank Lane, nearly opposite the entrance to Tower Farm, if the wooden gate opens? Walk along the track past the house and barn of Hollins Bank Farm, then soon after the wooded area you’ll need to via off across the field to the south for 90m beyond the first field wall. Otherwise, you’ll need to find another way of reaching the site from the lane, if that’s possible?

Dragon Stone, near Steeton, west Yorks.

Dragon Stone, near Steeton, west Yorks.

Cup-marked rock opposite Dragon Stone.

Cup-marked rock opposite Dragon Stone.

    In the corner of a farmer’s field above Little Snowden Hill there is an outcrop of gritstone rocks, or a cluster of rocks maybe. One of these known as ‘Dragon Stone’ bears many ancient cup-markings (rock-art). There are as many as 20 cup-marks on the this worn, flat rock, and around the sides and in the middle there are faint grooves running in a sort of circular fashion, but whether these were caused by erosion, or whether they are part of the carving, is not really known; and there is a crack in the rock which adds to the strange look of the stone. And why it is locally called ‘Dragon Stone’ is not known, although the rock might take on the look of a dragon at certain angles. On another rock, just opposite, and close by the wall there are a few more cup-marks, maybe up to 4 or more, although these can only be seen in a certain light and at an angle. This rock also has one or maybe two faint bowl-shapes made by erosion though these are often hidden away under a layer of lichen and grass. In the field beyond the wall (at SE 0354 4360) another cluster of rocks, one of which at least shows signs of a few faint cup-marks?

Sources and related websites:-

https://megalithix.wordpress.com/2010/09/04/dragon-stone-steeton/

https://megalithix.wordpress.com/2010/04/10/bowl-stone-steeton/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steeton,_West_Yorkshire


Cob Stone, Near Far Slippery Ford, Newsholme Dean, West Yorkshire

Cob Stone near Grey Stones Lane, Far Slippery Ford.

Cob Stone near Grey Stones Lane, Far Slippery Ford, west Yorkshire.

    OS grid reference: SE 00549 40890. In a field beside Grey Stones Lane and below an outcrop of rocks called Grey Stones Hill, near Far Slippery Ford, west Yorkshire, is a gritstone rock that is locally called Cob Stone. Whether it takes its name from a small round loaf of bread, or some-thing else, I don’t know with any certainty, but I am also told that the word “Cob” means ‘Devil’ in this part of the country, so it could mean “Devil’s Stone”. The rock has a cluster of quite well-defined cup-marks on top and maybe a few fainter cups-marks lower down. To reach the stone you can take the footpath going east from Long Gate Lane at Far Slippery Ford. This will bring you to the bottom of the field. Other than that, you could see if the wooden gate opens on Grey Stones Lane next to the track going down to Grey Stones Farm. If it opens, then please make sure it is secured after entering, and on going back out again!

Cob Stone, beside Grey Stones Lane (cluster of cup-markings).

Cob Stone, beside Grey Stones Lane (cluster of cup-markings).

Large boulder near Cob Stone (with pos- sible cup-markings)

Large boulder near Cob Stone (with “possible” cup-markings).

    Cob Stone or Devil’s Stone is a glacial erratic gritstone rock that was deposited by a retreating glacier many thousands of years ago at the end of the last Ice Age. On top of the stone there is a cluster of 7 or 8 small cup-marks and further down a few fainter cups can just be made out. However, these faint cup-marks might have been caused by erosion – it’s often difficult to tell one way or the other, and the rock itself is now very smooth on its side due to thousands of years of weathering. Some 68m to the south-west there is an even larger boulder; maybe it’s another Cob Stone?, and this is indeed roughly shaped like a loaf of bread! This large boulder looks to have a few cup-marks on top and on its side, or are these due to erosion? And there are a few other rocks in the same field that have “possible” cup-markings; it’s just a case of walking around and looking closely at the many small and large rocks, and there are indeed “many” to look at. Cob Stone is recorded in Boughey & Vickerman’s  2003 survey.

    And of further interest to the lover of rock-art is another large rock some 80 metres to the south-east. This can be found at the north side of the large barn belonging to Greystones Farm. See the link below:-

Cup-Marked rock in the field near Cob Stone.

Cup-Marked rock in the field near Cob Stone, Grey Stones Lane near Far Slippery Ford.

Stone near Cob Stone (possible faint cup-marks)

Stone near Cob Stone at Grey Stones Lane, Far Slippery Ford (possible faint cup-marks)

                                                                                      

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

                                                                                                                                         

  

Sources and related websites:-

https://megalithix.wordpress.com/2008/09/29/cob-stone/

https://thejournalofantiquities.com/2016/10/13/greystones-farm-cup-marked-rocks-near-newsholme-dean-west-Yorkshire/

                                                                            © Ray Spencer, The Journal Of Antiquities, 2016.

 


Greystones Farm Cup-Marked Rocks, Near Newsholme Dean, West Yorkshire

Greystones Farm Cup-Marked Rock (beside the large barn).

Greystones Farm Cup-Marked Rock (beside the large barn).

    OS Grid Reference: SE 00621 40844. Located beside the large barn of Greystones Farm, on Greystones Lane, is a gritstone rock which has several prehistoric cup-marks. A few other rocks is the same field also appear to have faint cup-marks, and one of these large rocks, locally called Cob Stone, also has “possible” cup-marks. Just above the farm there is an outcrop of gritstone rocks called Greystones Hill. The farm is a ¼ of a mile north of Far Slippery Ford, and the hamlet of Newsholme Dean is about 1 mile to the east on Todley Hall Road. To reach the site travel down Long Gate, then onto Coppy Lane and then Greystones Lane. Walk down the rough farm-track towards Greystones Farm, making sure the wooden gate is secured behind you. Via off the track to the large barn on the left – the cup-marked stone is beside this barn. You can also reach it via the footpath from Long Gate at Far Slippery Ford.

Greystones Farm Cup-Marked Rock (beside the large barn).

Greystones Farm Cup-Marked Rock (beside the large barn).

Greystones Farm Cup-Marked Rock (close up)

Greystones Farm Cup-Marked Rock (close up)

    Located at the north side of  Greystones Farm barn is a  large, weathered gritstone rock bearing several well-defined ancient cup-marks: as many as 15 tiny cups on the flat face of this soft rock. What these carvings represent we don’t really know: maybe they represent a sort of map of the stars, or they are just ancient graffiti or doodlings, or they are a map showing ancient springs, caves, or trackways.  Or do they perhaps represent something  else.  The whiteness, or greyness, of the rock is caused by weather related exposure over thousands of years – the exposed parts of the rock have been washed by rain to the colour that we see today, and so we have “greystones” which is sometimes spelt as “graystones”. A few of the larger rocks up the slope of the same field appear to also have cup-marks, although now very faint. One stone in particular called Cob Stone, near the top of the field at the other side of the track (SE 00553 40888) has eroded cup-marks on top. These cup-marked rocks were recorded and numbered by Boughey & Vickerman in their survey of 2003. (See The Northern Antiquarian link below).

Sources and related websites:-

https://megalithix.wordpress.com/2008/09/29/cob-stone/

http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1084602

                                                                   © Ray Spencer The Journal Of Antiquities.

 


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Hawks Stones, Stansfield Moor, Near Todmorden, West Yorkshire

Hawks Stones (as seen from Kebs Road, near Todmorden).

Hawks Stones (as seen from Kebs Road, near Todmorden).

Hawks Stones, near Todmorden (strange shaped rocks).

Hawks Stones, near Todmorden (strange shaped rocks).

    OS grid reference: SD 9233 2735. A gritstone outcrop at the western edge of Stansfield Moor above Kebs Road, near Todmorden, in west Yorkshire. Like its near neighbour, Bride Stones, Hawks or Hawk Stones has many strange-shaped weather worn rocks and boulders that were first laid-down many millions of years ago, and then fashioned by a retreating glacier during the last Ice Age – some 13,000 to 15,000 years ago. There are the usual naturally-formed rock basins, and a few of the larger boulders appear to have ancient cup-marks, although it is often hard to differentiate between erosion-related holes and man-made rock-art. To reach Hawks Stones take the footpath from Kebs Road going east up the slope near the “old” Sportsman public house, then after 60m follow the ridge – going north-north-east to where you will soon reach the gritstone outcrop. However, the farmer has put up a lot of barbed-wire fencing, which makes it difficult, if impossible, to access some parts of the site.

Possible cup-marked rock at Hawk Stones, near Todmorden.

Possible cup-marked rock at Hawks Stones, near Todmorden.

Rock basin at Hawks Stones, near Todmorden, west Yorkshire.

Rock basin at Hawks Stones, near Todmorden, west Yorkshire.

    Hawks or Hawk Stones over to the east of Todmorden is an outcrop of millstone grit rocks and boulders that have taken on the form of some strange and odd shapes over many thousands of years; the erosion caused by weathering has added to the general eerie look of the place, which has, perhaps, been associated with the druids and their ritual and sacrificial worship back in the mists of time. The many rock pools and basins that are worn into the rocks maybe adding to that strange, mysterious feeling that one gets when visiting these lonely, moorland places. Some of the larger rocks and boulders look to have “possible” prehistoric cup-marks, some being more pronounced, while others are much more fainter. Or could these have been made by weather-related erosion over thousands of years? The place-name Hawks or Hawk Stones is thought ‘not’ to be associated with, or named after, the bird of prey!

    The Local author Geoff Boswell in his book ‘There and Back’, thinks that Hawk Stones are well-named: “because this area is the natural habitat of many moorland birds.”

Hawks Stones (naturally formed rock basins).

Hawks Stones (naturally formed rock basins).

Hawks Stones (possible cup-marks, or something else).

Hawks Stones (cup-marks, or something else).

    Author Paul Bennett in his outstanding work ‘The Old Stones of Elmet’, says that Hawk Stones are: “Illustrated on the 1717 Greenwood map, this huge outcrop of rocks was first described as “druidical” by Watson (1775), by inference to the local folklore of them being sites of ancient worship—which they may well have been. These sentiments were later echoed by Crabtree (1836). Then in 1864, the historian and folklorist, Thomas Wilkinson, gave a lecture to the Lancashire and Cheshire Historical Society, where he drew attention to the folklore of  these rocks. He was particularly interested in the “druidical rock basins” carved atop of some of them—or cup-and ring stones. The etymology of the site relates to “hollows” and not hawks as its name implies, which may be a description of such basins.”

Sources and related websites:-

Bennett, Paul, The Old Stones of Elmet, Capall Bann Publishing, Milverton, Somerset, 2001.

Boswell, Geoff, There and Back, Delta G, Todmorden, 2000.

http://www.walkingenglishman.com/westyorkshire02.htm

https://thejournalofantiquities.com/2016/08/31/the-bridestones-near-todmorden-west-yorkshire/

                                                          © Ray Spencer, The Journal Of Antiquities.